The Catholic University of America
Law Faculty

Roger C. Hartley – Professor of Law

Hartley

Professor Hartley has been a tenured professor since 1981. He teaches primarily in the areas of labor law, constitutional law, federal courts, and civil procedure.
 
Previously he has taught courses in rights of persons with disabilities, appellate litigation, collective bargaining and labor arbitration, and the rights of members in their unions.
 
He is the past Secretary of the Labor and Employment Law Section of the American Bar Association and is a member of the Order of the Coif, the American Law Institute, the Labor and Employment Law Section of the American Bar Association, and the Industrial Relations Research Association. He has been admitted to practice in Pennsylvania and the District of Columbia and is a member of the Bar of the Supreme Court of the United States.
 

Professor Hartley earned a B.S. degree in labor relations from Cornell University, a J.D. degree from the University of Pittsburgh, and an LL.M. degree from George Washington University. Prior to teaching, he worked as a staff attorney for the National Labor Relations Board in Washington, D.C. in its Division of Advice and its Appellate Court Branch. Subsequently he was an associate with the Washington, D.C. law firm of O'Donoghue & O'Donoghue.

His book (with Bartosic), "Labor Relations Law in the Private Sector," currently is in its second edition and has been published in both hardback and paperback versions. In addition, Professor Hartley has published numerous articles, primarily in the areas of labor law, constitutional law, and federal courts and has lectured widely in these and other subject areas. He currently devotes considerable time as director of the John Fanning Center for Labor Studies at the Columbus School of Law and as the coordinator of the Plato Papps Fellowship program, which provides law students with work and educational experiences in the area of workers' rights.            

 

Research and Writing

BOOKS

Triumph from Defeat: How Failed Attempts to Amend the Constitution Shape America’s Political and Legal Culture (forthcoming).

 

Labor Relations Law in the Private Sector. Second edition. Philadelphia: American Law Institute-American Bar Association, Committee on Continuing Professional Education, 1986 (with Bartosic).

Labor Relations Law in the Private Sector. Philadelphia: American Law Institute-American Bar Association, Committee on Continuing Professional Education, 1977 (with Bartosic).



BOOK CHAPTERS

"Labor." Hospital Law Manual. Pittsburgh: Aspen Systems, 1972.
 

JOURNAL ARTICLES

"The Freedom Not to Listen: A Constitutional Analysis of Compulsory Indoctrination Though Workplace Captive Audience Meetings," 31 Berkeley J. Empl & Lab. L. 65 (2010). 

“Congressional Devolution of Immigration Policymaking,” 1 Duke J. Const. & Pub. Policy 93 (2006).
 

"Cross Burning -- Hate Speech as Free Speech: A Comment on Virginia v. Black," 54 Catholic University Law Review 1 (2004).

"Preemption's Market Participant Immunity -- a Constitutional Interpretation: Implications for Living Wage and Labor Peace Policies, 5 University Pennsylvania Journal Labor & Employment Law 229 (2003).

"Enforcing Federal Civil Rights Against Public Entities After Garrett," 28 Journal College & University Law 1 (2001)

"Non-Legislative Labor Law Reform and Pre-Recognition Labor Neutrality Agreements: The Newest Civil Rights Movement," 22 Berkeley Journal Employment & Labor Law. 101 (2001).

"The Alden Trilogy: Praise and Protest." Harvard Journal of Law and Public Policy (2000).

"The New Federalism and the ADA - State Sovereign Immunity From Private Damage Suits After Boerne." - NYU Review of Law & Social Change 24 (1999): 67.

"Reconceiving the Role of Section 8(b)(1)(A): 1947-1997: An Essay on Collective Empowerment and the Public Good." Catholic University Law Review 47 (June 1998): 825.

"Foreword: The Supreme Court's 1991-1992 Labor and Employment Law Term." Labor Lawyer 8 (Fall 1992): 739.

"The Supreme Court's 1991-1992 Labor and Employment Law Term." Labor Lawyer 8 (1992): 757.

"Recent Developments Under The National Labor Relations Act." Proceedings, Committee on the Development of the Law Under the National Labor Relations Act, Labor and Employment Law Section, American Bar Association (1992): 35.

"National Labor Relations Board Control of Union Discipline and the Myth of Nonintervention." Vermont Law Review 16 (Summer 1991): 11.

"Constitutional Values and the Adjudication of Taft-Hartley Act Dues Objector Cases." Hastings Law Journal 41 (November 1989):1.

"What to Do When Employers Discriminate Against Unions (Part 2)." 33 Practical Lawyer (April 1987): 75 (with Bartosic).

"What to Do When Employers Discriminate Against Unions (Part 1)." Practical Lawyer 33 (March 1987): 33 (with Bartosic).

"The Framework of Democracy in Union Government." Catholic University Law Review 32 (Fall 1982): 13.

"International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers v. Foust." 1979 Preview Of Supreme Court Cases 3 (March, 1979).

"Beth Israel Hospital v. National Labor Relations Board." 1978 Preview Of Supreme Court Cases 1 (April, 1978).

"The Employer's Duty To Supply Information To The Union - A Study Of The Interplay of Administrative and Judicial Rationalization." Cornell Law Review 58 (1972): 23 (With Bartosic).

"Primer To Practice & Procedure Under Title VII Of The Civil Rights Act of 1964." Pittiburg Law Review 31 (Spring,1970): 407.

"Pennsylvania's Proposed Public Employees Relations Act: A Landmark of Sound Progress or an Invitation to a Quagmire?" Pittsburg Law Review 30 (Winter,1969): 693.

"Appearance of Bias As Grounds for Vacating An Arbitrator's Award - Implications of Commonwealth Coatings Co. for Labor Arbitration." Pittsburg Law Review 30 (Spring 1969):566.

"Recommendations of the Governor's Commission To Revise the Public Employment law of Pennsylvania: A Preliminary Assessment." Pittsburg Law Review 30 (Fall,1968):161.

In His Words ...

“Building a solid foundation of self-confidence is a worthy goal but gaining the necessary self-assurance takes time. Law school offers many confidence building opportunities. My role as a teacher includes helping my students to overcome the fear of failure and thus gain insight into the qualities each possesses that makes that student special and effective.”

– Roger C. Hartley

Contact

Office: 476 Law School
The Catholic University of America
3600 John McCormack Rd., NE
Washington, D.C. 20064

Phone: 202-319-5215

E-mail: hartley@law.edu
 

Courses

  • Labor Law
  • Federal Courts
  • Advanced Federal Civil Procedure
     

Education

LL.M
George Washington University, 1972

J.D.
University of Pittsburgh, 1970

B.S.
Cornell University, 1965 

 

Areas of Expertise

  • Labor Law
  • Constitutional Law
  • Federal Courts
  • Civil Procedure
     

Experience

  • Member, Foreign service Grievance Board (2008-2010)
  •  Alternate Arbitrator - Building and Construction Trades Department, AFL-CIO and United Steelworkers of America agreement to resolve jurisdictional disputes (1998 to Present).
  • National Labor Relations Board
    Washington, D.C., Appellate Court Division, 1971-73