The Catholic University of America

ACADEMIC RULES

J.D. PROGRAM and LL.M. Program

 
J.D. PROGRAM
I. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
II. REGISTRATION, COURSE LOADS, COURSE WITHDRAWAL, AND DIVISION SWITCHES (OR DIVISION CHANGE)
III.
IV. LIMITATION ON SIMULTANEOUS ENROLLMENT IN OTHER DEGREE PROGRAMS
V. GRADING AND GOOD STANDING
VI. RETAKING REQUIRED COURSES
VII. PROBATION, EXCLUSION, AND READMISSION
VIII. CLASS ATTENDANCE AND COURSE REQUIREMENTS
IX. COMPONENTS OF GRADE
X. EXAMINATIONS
XI. COMPLETION OF COURSES: INCOMPLETES
XII. AVAILABILITY OF GRADES AND CLASS RANKS
XIII. UPPER LEVEL WRITING REQUIREMENT
XIV. PROFESSIONAL SKILLS REQUIREMENT
XV. TRANSITION TO PRACTICE REQUIREMENT
XVI. PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENT
XVII. STUDENT RECORDS AND TRANSCRIPTS
XVIII. COURSES OUTSIDE THE LAW SCHOOL DURING THE REGULAR SCHOOL YEAR
XIX. SUMMER & INTERSESSION COURSES AT OTHER LAW SCHOOLS
XX. INTERRUPTION OF STUDIES
XXI. STUDENT CONDUCT AND DISCIPLINE
XXII. BAR EXAMINATIONS
XXIII. CREDIT THAT MUST BE EARNED IN REGULARLY SCHEDULED LAW SCHOOL CLASS SESSION
XXIV. CLINICAL COURSES
XXV. TRANSFER OF CREDIT POLICY
XXVI. ADVANCED STANDING FOR GRADUATES OF FOREIGN LAW PROGRAMS
XXVII. STUDENT COMPLAINTS REGARDING COMPLIANCE WITH THE ABA STANDARDS
LL.M. PROGRAM
I. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS
II. REGISTRATION, COURSE LOADS, AND WITHDRAWAL
III. GRADING
IV. GOOD STANDING, PROBATION, EXCLUSION, AND READMISSION
V. CLASS ATTENDANCE AND COURSE REQUIREMENTS
VI. COMPONENTS OF GRADE
VII. EXAMINATIONS
VIII. COMPLETION OF COURSES: INCOMPLETES
IX. AVAILABILITY OF GRADES
X. WRITING REQUIREMENT
XI. STUDENT RECORDS AND TRANSCRIPTS
XII. COURSES OUTSIDE THE LAW SCHOOL
XIII. ACCOMMODATION UNDER ADA
XIV. INTERRUPTION OF STUDIES
XV. AUDITS
XVI. STUDENT CONDUCT AND DISCIPLINE
XVII. BAR EXAMINATIONS
XVIII. TRANSFER OF CREDIT
XIX.   STUDENT COMPLAINTS REGARDING COMPLIANCE WITH THE ABA STANDARDS

 

 

J.D. PROGRAM

The academic rules at the date of publication are listed below. From time to time the faculty may promulgate new rules or alter the present rules. Students are considered to be on notice of changes or additions to these rules when they are approved by the faculty and posted on the website of The Catholic University of America Columbus School of Law. To the extent permitted, in extraordinary cases, exceptions to these rules may be granted by the dean for good cause shown.
 
To be eligible for the degree of Juris Doctor, a student must complete the following requirements during a period, not more than 84 months after the student has started at the law school or a law school from which CUA has accepted transfer credit:
 
a. earn at least 84 semester hours of credit while maintaining a cumulative average of at least 2.15 and a semester average of at least 1.82 (students admitted 2003 through fall 2010) or maintaining a cumulative average of at least 2.25 and a semester average of at least 1.82 (students admitted fall 2011 and subsequently);
 
b. satisfactorily complete the upper-division writing requirement, Academic Rule XIII;
 
c. satisfactorily complete a Professional Skills course, Academic Rule XIV;
 
d. satisfactorily complete the Professional Responsibility course;
 
e. satisfactorily complete the Transition to Practice course requirement, Academic Rule XV;
 
f. attend six professional education programs during their time in law school, Academic Rule XVI;
 
g. meet the minimum residency requirement. Residency means the number of Columbus School of Law semesters that a student must attend. A semester is defined as a fall or spring academic term. Summer school is not a semester.
 
Students enrolled in the full-time (day division) program must attend six semesters. Full-time students who attend one CUA summer session of three or more credits may switch to part-time status in their final semester.
 
Students enrolled in the part-time (evening division) program must attend eight semesters. Part-time students who attend two CUA summer sessions of four or more credits may accelerate their graduation by one semester (i.e. complete coursework by the end of their seventh semester). A part-time student who switches to the full-time division at the end of the first year of law school may graduate after six semesters.


II. REGISTRATION, COURSE LOADS,
COURSE WITHDRAWAL, AND DIVISION SWITCHES (OR DIVISION CHANGES)

A. Registration Dates
 
Registration dates are listed in the Academic Calendar. Students who fail to register for any courses prior to the first day of class incur a late registration fee. Students may add or drop courses through the Add/Drop period listed on the Academic Calendar. No course may be added after the add/drop deadline. 
 
B. Course Loads
 
A full-time (day-division) student may not enroll for more than 16 or fewer than 12 credit hours per semester; a part-time (evening-division) student may not enroll for more than 11 hours or fewer than 8 credit hours per semester. Students who seek to deviate from these course load limits must seek written permission from the Academic Dean’s office.
 
C. Course Withdrawals
 
Students are permitted to withdraw from an elective course after the Add/Drop deadline but before mid-semester as long as the resulting course load remains within the limitations specified in Rule II(B) supra. Students who wish to withdraw from an elective course after mid-semester must request permission of both the course instructor and the Office of Academic Affairs. Approval will ordinarily not be given if the resulting course load is below that specified in Rule II(B) supra. In no event will withdrawals be authorized after the last day of class for that semester.
 
D. Auditing of Classes
 
Students may enroll on an “audit” basis for elective courses. Students enrolled on an “audit” basis do not take the examination or participate in any other graded exercises in the class and do not receive credit toward the J.D. for the audited class. The limitations of Rule II(B) supra apply (i.e. the audited class shall not cause the student to exceed the maximum number of allowed credit  hours and the student must retain the minimum number of required credit hours toward the J.D.). Auditors are not excused from class attendance requirements.
 
E. Changing Divisions
 
Switches or Changes between part-time and full-time are permitted by written application to the Academic Dean’s Office. Normally a student will be permitted to Switch or Change only once during his or her law school career.

 

III. MAXIMUM EMPLOYMENT
FOR FULL TIME STUDENTS

Students enrolled in more than 12 credit hours per semester shall work no more than 20 hours per week. Students desiring to work more than 20 hours per week may not remain in full-time status and should contact the Office of Academic Affairs regarding the possibility of switching to the part-time division.
 

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IV. LIMITATION ON SIMULTANEOUS ENROLLMENT IN OTHER DEGREE PROGRAMS

Due to the intensive nature of law study, students may simultaneously enroll in another degree program outside CUA Law only with the prior approval of the Academic Dean. This prohibition does not apply to students enrolled in a CUA Law joint degree program with another department of CUA.

 

V. GRADING AND GOOD STANDING 

A. Grades

    Grades for all students will be based on the following letter-grade   scale:
 
     A+, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D, F (Failure), F* (Administrative Failure)
 
   The grade of F* should be awarded to students who did not officially withdraw from the course, but who failed to attend and participate in course activities through the last day of classes.
 
   Letter-based grades will be converted to numerical values to calculate grade point averages, to determine class rank and to determine academic status as follows: A+=4.33; A=4.0; A-=3.67; B+=3.33; B=3.0; B-=2.67; C+=2.33; C=2.0; C-=1.67; D=1.0; F=0; F*=0.
 
B. Good Standing

The faculty revised the Good Standing criteria in academic year 2010–2011. The change is effective for the class entering CUA Law in fall 2011and subsequently.

     To be in good standing, students who entered CUA Law before fall 2011 must:
 
a. maintain a cumulative average of at least 2.15, and
b. attain a semester average of at least 1.82 for each semester.
 
     A student whose cumulative average falls below 2.15 or whose average falls below 1.82 for any semester is placed on probation (see Rule VII: Probation, Exclusion, and Readmission).

To be in good standing students who enter fall 2011 and subsequently must:

a. maintain a cumulative average of at least 2.25; and
b. attain a semester average of at least 1.82 for each semester.
    
     A student whose cumulative average falls below 2.25, or whose average falls below 1.82 for any semester, is placed on probation. (see  Rule VII: Probation, Exclusion and Readmission).
 
C. First Year Students: Academic Standing

1. Exclusion: A student whose cumulative average for the first year is below 1.82, and whose average for the spring semester is less than 2.25, will be excluded from law school.
 
2. Probation:  A student whose cumulative average for the first year is below 1.82 but whose average for the spring semester is at least 2.25 will be placed on probation and must then attain an average of at least 2.25 for each semester subsequently and must raise his or her cumulative average to 2.25 by the end of the second semester on probation or be excluded. A student whose cumulative average for the first year is below 2.25, but not below 1.82, will be placed on probation.
 
3. Class Rank: Academic standing and class rank for first-year students in both the full-time and part-time division will be based on all work completed in the first two semesters. Students will not be ranked at the completion of the first year unless all required courses have been completed and the student does not have any incomplete grades at the time of ranking.  
 
D. Summer School

Summer school is not a semester. Summer school grades are computed with grades for the succeeding regular semester.
 
E. Students at Academic Risk
 
Students who enter CUA Law in fall 2011 and subsequently who, after the first semester of law school, have a GPA below 2.33, will be notified that they are academically at risk. This notification will be by letter and will not appear on the academic transcript.
 
F. Students with GPA below 2.25 Precluded from Participating in Journal Writing Competition

Students who have a GPA below 2.25 will not be allowed to participate in the Journal Writing Competition.
 
G. Standards of Grade Distribution

1. The faculty acknowledges the importance of applying grading standards consistently, particularly in required courses, to protect the integrity of those standards as a reliable measure of student performance and to assure that students’ academic averages and class rankings are truly comparable.
 
2. Where the credentials of entering students have been balanced across sections, as in the first year, or where there is a sufficiently large sample of students in a class, there is no empirical basis to justify widely divergent medians, means, or distributions of grades among those sections and classes. CUA Law, therefore, prescribes mean/median ranges for its courses. This rule applies to first-year courses, upper-division courses, and seminars and clinics. CUA Law prohibits the faculty from submitting grades that are widely divergent from these prescribed ranges. However, under certain circumstances, a faculty member may submit grades that are marginally divergent. The grade ranges become merely advisory in small classes (i.e., classes where there are 16 or fewer students (see below).
This rule applies to first-year courses, upper-division courses, and seminars and clinics. The law school prohibits the faculty from submitting grades that are widely divergent from these prescribed ranges. However, under certain circumstances, a faculty member may submit grades that are marginally divergent. The grade ranges become merely advisory in small classes, i.e., classes where there are 16 or fewer students (See Rule V.6.c.iv).
 
3. The distribution of grades shall be as follows:
 
a. In all first-year courses and upper-division courses, other than seminars, clinics, and small classes covered by Rules V(G)(3)(b) and V(G)(3)(d) below, the grade distribution shall have a mean falling within a range of 3.00–3.30 and an advisory median of B/B+.
 
b. In seminars and clinics, except those covered in Rule V(G)(3)(d) below, the grade distribution shall have a mean falling within a range of 3.00–3.60 and an advisory median of B/B+. A “seminar” is a course, ordinarily of not more than 20 students, in which students have substantial responsibility for class presentations and discussion. With respect to courses in which credit is based on the submission of a supervised paper or on a supervised clinical performance, the median and mean grades shall be within the same range prescribed for seminars and clinics.
 
c. Grades at the level of exceptional (A+) will be awarded only when the student’s work for the course is of unusually high quality compared to that expected generally of law students. While grades at the level of unsatisfactory or failure (C-, D, F, or F*) may be uncommon, those grades will be awarded when the student’s work product fails to reflect minimally competent law schoolwork for the course.
 
d. In any upper-level course where actual student enrollment is 16 or fewer or where the course enrollment cap is 16 or fewer, the mean grade ranges above become advisory rather than mandatory.
 
d. The Enforcement of Distributional Ranges
 
i. Faculty members are responsible for calculating and verifying (with faculty support staff assistance, if necessary), the mean and median grade for each course (excluding delayed examinations/papers), and for including such information in their submission of grades. The mean and median for each course must fall within the applicable published range appearing in the law school Announcements, with the exceptions provided in paragraphs iii and v below. For purposes of computing the mean and median only, faculty members should calculate all grades of C, C-, D or F as a 2.0. However, this has no effect on the calculation of an individual student GPA. Each student will receive the numerical value of whatever grade he or she earns in a course, i.e., an A+ will be calculated as a 4.33; an A will be calculated as a 4.0; an A- will be calculated as 3.67; a B+ will be calculated as a 3.33; a B will be calculated as a 3.0; a B- will be calculated as 2.67; a C+ as a 2.33; C as 2.0; C- as 1.67; a D as 1.0; and an F as 0.0. In assessing compliance, the top and bottom of the range is the number taken to two decimal points, e.g., 3.00, and not some fraction subject to being rounded off thereto. Whether a mean and median falls within the published range is to be determined after the addition or subtraction of any discretionary steps.
 
ii. After approval by the Academic Dean, the Registrar shall post the mean and median with the grades for all courses.
 
iii. The Office of the Dean shall enforce faculty compliance with the published mean/median ranges. Such enforcement applies equally to all categories of courses, including electives, as well as staples and first-year courses, with the exception of small classes, covered by Rule V.6.c.iv. For classes falling within this exception, ranges are advisory rather than mandatory.
 
iv. If a faculty member submits divergent grades, the Office of the Dean will automatically return them for appropriate adjustment. Grades not adjusted will not be posted and will not be entered into the record.
 
v. A faculty member may submit a written request, for an exception to this rule, with written justification. The Office of the Dean is permitted to make an exception and post grades that are not widely divergent subsequent to such a request. If a faculty member submits grades outside of the published range without the required justification the Office of the Dean will return the grades for adjustment. Grades not adjusted will not be posted and will not be entered into the record.
 
7. Transfer Students

Transfer students will be subject to the normal academic standing requirements based on work at this law school. However, transfer students will not be ranked during their attendance and will be ranked at graduation only if they complete two-thirds of the work required for the J.D. or 56 credits at this law school.
 
8. Procedure for Appealing Failing Grade
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1. Retaking Required Courses

If a student’s grade in a required course is an F or F*, the course must be repeated the next time it is offered in the student’s division. In determining which section of the course should be taken, consideration will be given to the student’s preference but the dean will make the final decision. Both grades will show on the student’s transcript and both grades will be included in the computation of the cumulative average. A student may not retake a class in which a passing grade was received.
 
2. Retaking Elective Courses
 
A student may retake a failed elective course. However, both grades will show on the student’s transcript and both grades will be included in the computation of the student’s cumulative GPA. A student may not retake a class in which a passing grade was received.
 
 
The faculty revised the Good Standing criteria in academic year 2010–11. The change was effective with the class entering in fall 2011, however, students who entered prior to that date retain the requirement effective when they entered:
 
1. Probation: Cumulative Average

a. A student placed on probation for failure to maintain the required cumulative average of at least 2.15 for students admitted prior to 2011; a cumulative average of at least 2.25 for students admitted in 2011 and subsequently, must attain the required minimum semester average (2.15 or 2.25 respectively) in the following semester courses or be excluded from law school.
 
b. Such student also must raise his or her cumulative average to at least the required level (2.15 or 2.25 respectively) to remove himself or herself from probation. A student whose cumulative average is below the required 2.15 or 2.25, respectively, at the end of two successive semesters on probation will be excluded from law school.
 
2. Probation: Semester Average Below 1.82

A student placed on probation for attaining a semester average below 1.82 must attain an average of at least 2.15 for students admitted prior to 2011; an average of at least 2.25 for students admitted 2011 and subsequently in the following semester or be excluded from law school.
 
3. Required Participation in Academic Excellence Program

a. First-Year Students
Following the fall semester of the first year, the following students are required to participate in the Academic Excellence Program: a) any first-year student whose average for the first-year fall semester falls within the lower 15 percent of the class; b) any student who has received the grade of D or F in any course; or c) a student referred by the Office of Academic Affairs. Each student must develop and implement a written individual academic plan approved by the director. No first-year student required to participate in the Academic Excellence Program by this rule will be permitted to register for subsequent fall semester courses until the student provides the Office of Academic Affairs with a statement, signed by the director of the Academic Excellence Program confirming that the requirements of this rule have been satisfied. Furthermore, the dean or the dean’s designee has discretion to mandate academic support on an individual basis. 
 
b. Upper-Division Students
An upper-division student placed on probation is required to participate in the Academic Excellence Program. Students must develop and implement a written individual academic plan approved by the director of Academic Excellence Program. No student required to participate in the Academic Excellence Program by this rule will be permitted to register for subsequent semester courses until the student provides the Office of Academic Affairs with a statement, signed by the director of the Academic Excellence Program, confirming that the requirements of this rule have been satisfied. Furthermore, the dean or the dean’s designee has discretion to mandate academic support on an individual basis. 
 
4. Probation Will Not be Repeated
 
A student who has been restored to good standing and who subsequently attains an average of less than 1.82 for any semester or whose cumulative average falls below 2.15 (students admitted prior to 2011) or 2.25 (students admitted 2011 and subsequently) will be excluded from the law school without being given a second probation period.
 
5. Readmission Following Exclusion

a. As a general policy, students excluded for academic deficiency will not be readmitted to the law school. The faculty will consider an excluded student’s petition for readmission upon a showing of circumstances affecting his or her academic performance while here or substantially changed circumstances since his or her exclusion.
 
b. An excluded student will be considered for readmission only once and normally will not be considered within the first year following exclusion. Any student who wishes the faculty to waive the one-year waiting period must request such waiver in writing and give reasons therefore.
 
c. A student seeking readmission subsequent to exclusion must be able to complete the remaining work for the degree within the maximum period of candidacy (84 months from the date the student first commenced law study).
 
d. As a rule the faculty excludes the votes of student representatives to the faculty and to the Student Affairs Committee on matters pertaining to a student’s petition for readmission. However, upon written request of the student seeking readmission, the student representative will be permitted to vote on the petition.
 
e. A student who is readmitted following exclusion must, in the first year of readmission, repeat all required courses in which he or she did not receive satisfactory grades (of C or better) during his or her previous attendance at the law school. Only satisfactory prior work (grades of C or better) will be applied toward degree requirements. The student’s average for the first semester after readmission will be based only on work taken in that semester. A student’s cumulative average after the first semester following readmission shall include earlier work (work completed prior to exclusion) in which the student earned a grade of C or better.
 
f. Required standards of performance following readmission.
 
i. A readmitted student after one year of law school work must earn an average of at least 1.82 in the first semester following readmission and must earn a cumulative average of at least 2.15 (if initially admitted fall 2003 to fall 2010) or 2.25 (if initially admitted 2011 or subsequently) by the end of the second semester following readmission.
 
ii. A student readmitted to the law school who has accumulated academic credit beyond the first year of law school work must earn an average of at least 2.15 (if original admission was prior to 2011) or 2.25 (if original admission was 2011 or subsequently) in the first semester following readmission and must maintain a cumulative average of at least 2.15 (if original admission was prior to 2011) or 2.25 (if original admission was 2011 or subsequently).
 
iii. A readmitted student will not be placed on probation at any time following readmission.
 
 
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1. Class Attendance

Regular and punctual attendance at class meetings or equivalent course exercises is a condition of receiving credit in all courses. If a student misses more than two hours of coursework for each credit hour assigned to the course, the instructor may direct the dean’s office to exclude the student from the course. Instructors in limited-enrollment courses (seminars, clinics, simulations, etc.) may set stricter attendance rules for those courses, including required attendance at the first or other specified class meetings; if a student fails to meet these requirements the instructor may direct the dean’s office to exclude the student from the course. Each instructor is responsible for announcing and enforcing the specific attendance policy for that course.
 
Repeated exclusion from classes for violation of these rules shall be grounds for dismissal from the law school upon a vote of the faculty.
 
2. Course Requirements

Individual instructors are free to determine their own teaching method and materials and whether their course grade will be based on examination, a research paper, or a combination of the two, or pursuant to Rule IX. Individual instructors also may designate prerequisites for their courses.
 
 
1. Except as provided below in sections 2–4, each student’s grade shall be based solely on an anonymous written examination administered at the end of the course pursuant to Rule X.
 
2. Courses Exempt by Category
 
Clinical courses, externship courses, simulated lawyering skills courses, seminars, and all courses that satisfy the Writing Requirement pursuant to Rule XIII are not governed by paragraph 1. Instructors in those courses may base their grades on criteria established by the individual instructors. The criteria must be set forth in writing and distributed to the students in the course at or before the first class meeting.
 
3. Instructor Option re Student Work Product
 
a. In any one-semester course other than those listed in paragraph 2, at the instructor’s option up to 30 percent of the final grade may be based on student work product other than the final examination. In any two-semester course other than those listed in paragraph 2, at the instructor’s option up to 30 percent of the final grade may be based on student work product other than the semester-end examinations. 
 
b. The student work product that comprises the non-examination portion of the final grade may consist of answers to written problems; research or drafting assignments; periodic quizzes; a mid-semester test; classroom demonstrations, presentations, or reports; individual or team exercises such as simulations of interviews, depositions, arguments, hearings, negotiations, or the like; or any other activity during the semester that can be objectively assessed and compared from one student to another.
 
c. Any instructor intending to base a portion of the grade on student work product other than a final examination must make that election, set forth the criteria for the grade in writing, and distribute it to the students in the course at or before the first class meeting. The instructor may add no non-examination grading component criteria after the initial distribution of the criteria to the students. Previously announced non-examination grading criteria may be eliminated or changed by the instructor so long as the change is made in writing and distributed to the students before the last day of classes.
 
d. When the final grades are submitted to the dean’s office, the instructor must submit a written worksheet or compilation that identifies the non-examination component(s) for each student.
 
e. The instructor should grade the non-examination components on an anonymous basis, whenever feasible, especially in first year courses.
 
4. Instructor Option re Classroom Performance

At the instructor’s option, assessment of classroom performance, which includes participation in class discussions and in-class exercises other than those listed in section 3, may raise or lower a student’s grade for the course by a single letter-grade step. A single letter-grade step change is a change from an A to an A+ or A-, from a B+ to an A- or B, etc. No grade of D or F may, however, be created or altered though an addition of or subtraction of a step as provided in this section. The grades for the class, including any classroom performance steps, must meet the requirements of Academic Rule V.6.d.i.
 
 
Anonymous written examinations are conducted in all courses at the end of each semester, except as provided in Rule IX.
 
1. Times and Place for Examinations

Examinations will be administered, according to a posted schedule, in a special period following the end of all regular class meetings. All exams must be taken during that period unless incompletes are entered for good cause. The posted schedule designates specific starting times for exams and will be issued in draft form no later than the beginning of the semester. Examinations that deviate from the time limits set in section 3 below must be identified at that time.
 
2. Proctors

Faculty members or others hired for the purpose will be assigned as proctors for each room in which examinations are being taken. Proctors will distribute and collect exams in the assigned room and will remain in the room during the exam.
 
3. Time Limits

In-class examinations will be one to four hours’ duration, as the instructor shall determine. In non-required courses, an in-class examination may exceed the four-hour limit on condition that students are advised of that longer duration no later than the first day of class.
The amount of time allowed will be stated on the examination itself, and this time is absolute. At the stated expiration time, all students must turn in their exams promptly to the proctor. The proctor is instructed to notify the Office of the Dean regarding the examination papers of students who continue to write past the time limit. Any student who is unavoidably late for the beginning of an examination may see the dean or the dean's designee, who may extend the deadline for that student for sufficient reason. Similarly, students who become ill during an exam should report the illness to the proctor. The proctor will collect that student’s examination materials and will report the illness to the dean, who may extend the deadline or reschedule the exam.
 
4. Rescheduling of Examinations

a. Students may request rescheduling of examinations on account of personal or family illness or emergency or an exam conflict. Any rescheduling will be to the earliest possible date following the originally scheduled time at which all other rescheduled students will be available to take the examination. No examination will be rescheduled to a time prior to the time at which the examination period starts. Examinations will not be advanced except in extraordinary circumstances. With regards to any exam rescheduled in advance of a regularly scheduled exam, faculty members will be consulted prior to the Office of Academic Affairs making such accommodations.
 
b. If a student has two exams in less than 48 hours (the 48-hour period is computed from the starting time for each exam), one exam will be rescheduled so that the exams will be at least 48 hours apart.
 
c. Reasons of personal convenience do not warrant rescheduling examinations.
 
d. Matters relating to employment do not generally warrant rescheduling of examinations. Students who are required by their employers to travel outside of the area may submit documentation of the travel requirement to the Dean’s Office to request rescheduling
 
e. Take-home exams and paper due dates are excluded from rescheduling consideration.
 
5. Failure to Appear for Scheduled Examination

Any student who, without approved rescheduling, fails to appear for an examination at the time scheduled will receive an F for that exam.
 
6. General Examination Format

Examinations in the law school will consist of a series of questions or problems dealing with the subject matter of the course. In preparing such examinations, instructors may designate the weight- or time-allocation for each question or problem.
 
7. Take-Home Examinations

An instructor may give a take-home examination in any course. Take-home exams should be distributed and returned at fixed times, and the time allotted should be neither so short nor so long as to interfere with other examinations being administered. Policies stated above with respect to deadlines, and failure to appear apply to take-home exams as well as to regular exams. In giving take-home exams, instructors should avoid using the take-home format as a substitute for a term research paper, and should presume that the exam can be answered from required course materials.
Take-home exams should be in the same format as regular exams and should be returnable within a maximum of 48 hours after distribution. The instructor should specify appropriate amounts of time for preparing and writing exam answers and should set maximum page or word limits for the exam.
 
8. Materials in Examination Rooms

Instructors should announce in class, advise the proctor, and indicate on the examination questions what (if any) materials students may bring into the examination room. Any other notes, books, or materials must be placed out of reach. Cell phones must be turned off and placed with other materials out of reach. Students are allowed to use earplugs during the exam. Students are not allowed to use the headphones from any electronic device.
 
9. Anonymity of Examinations

Examinations are taken and graded anonymously. Students are responsible for obtaining exam numbers according to procedures set by the dean’s office. Students must identify their exams only with their exam number. To preserve grading anonymity, students are prohibited from contacting current semester faculty on grade-related matters between the date that the exam is administered and the date that the grades are posted in Cardinal Station.
 
10. Review of Exams C+ or Below

Any student who has received the grade of C+ or below in any course is required to review the examination and the model answer the professor has prepared for that examination and discuss the review with the professor. For a grade received in the spring term, this review must occur no later than four weeks after the start of fall classes. For a grade received in the fall term, this review must occur no later than six weeks after the start of spring classes. No student required to review an examination by this rule will be permitted to register for courses taken in the semester subsequent to the semester when the grade was posted unless the student provides the Office of the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs a statement, signed by the professor assigning the grade of C+ or below, confirming the requirement of this rule has been satisfied. The limitation on registering for courses shall apply up to, but not including, the registration period for courses to be taken in the last semester of the students' legal study.

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1. Students in all courses are expected to complete their coursework within the semester in which the course is offered. In examination courses this means taking the exam at the time scheduled. In courses in which research papers comprise all or part of the coursework, such papers must be submitted at the times fixed by the instructor but in no event later than the last day of scheduled exams for the semester.
 
2. When a student is unable, because of illness or other hardship, to complete coursework (other than the examination) on the due date(s), the student should advise the instructor promptly. The instructor may then direct the entry of a grade of incomplete in the course. Incomplete grades must be made up at a time determined by the instructor and, in any event, no later than midsemester, as noted in the Academic Calendar. Incomplete grades will be used rarely and only in extraordinary cases and will not be used when the student simply has failed to complete coursework. A student whose transcript reflects a grade of incomplete will not be officially ranked.
 
No incomplete may be entered for Summer School courses.
Failure to complete coursework on the due date or, in the case of an incomplete, by the middle of the following semester, will result in the entry of a grade of F for the course.
 
 
1. Availability of Grades

Final coursework grades are available through Cardinal Students.
 
2. Class Rank

Class ranks for J.D. students will be computed after each spring semester and upon graduation. Students completing their degrees in summer or mid-year will be ranked with J.D. students finishing in the following May. Transfer students will not be ranked during law school, and will be ranked at graduation only if they complete at least two thirds of the required credits for the J.D., i.e., 56 credits, at this law school.
 
3. Grade Changes

Grades in any course are considered final once submitted to the Office of the Dean. The Office of the Dean may change an otherwise final grade only on written certification from the faculty member either (1) that the final grade reflects an incorrect mathematical computation or recordation or (2) that, in determining the particular exam or paper grade, the faculty member evaluated the student’s work differently from that of all others in the course. (The latter criterion does not contemplate changes in the classroom performance [Rule IX.4] portion of any final grade).
 
No final grade will be changed merely to restore a student to good standing, to assure academic credit for the course, or to improve class rank at this institution or any other; nor will a grade be changed because, on review, the faculty member is persuaded the student had a better (or worse) grasp of the course material than the exam or paper evidenced on its face.
 
In no event may any final grade be changed unless the faculty member’s written certification reaches the Office of the Dean by the middle of the semester following that for which the grade was entered.
 
4. Submission of Grades by Faculty
Faculty members are expected to submit grades as soon as possible. Absent an extension from the dean, grades are to be submitted no later than four weeks from the conclusion of the examination period. In order to award honors at graduation, grades of graduating students in their last semester must be submitted at a time to be designated by the dean.
 
 
 
1. Introduction

Each student must complete at least two substantial writing projects after the first year of law school. These projects usually involve legal research and analysis as well, but the instructor supervising a writing project that satisfies this requirement is expected, to the extent practicable, to critique the student’s writing apart from the research and analysis, discuss these critiques with the student, and base a significant portion of the grade on the writing itself. Note that students may not count a course for both the Writing Requirement and the Professional Skills Requirement except for students completing a clinical course of 6 or more credits. 
 
2. Writing Requirement

a. Each upper-division student must complete the two writing projects with a grade of B- or better. In a qualifying course where the course grade is not the same as the grade for the writing component, the writing component grade must be a B- or above to satisfy this requirement.
 
b. To satisfy the writing requirement a project must include three basic elements: (1) close faculty supervision of the writing process; (2) submission of at least one substantially complete draft in addition to the final product; and (3) feedback on interim drafts in the form of written comments, regular conferences, or both. In addition, each writing project must include a research component appropriate to its scope and genre.
 
c.        Reworking or extending prior papers, modifying work done for employers, or compiling research done by others is not acceptable
 
d. The Writing Requirement must be met by taking a practice-oriented legal writing course and a second legal writing course in one of the categories listed in section ii:
 
i. All students MUST take ONE of the practice-oriented writing courses. The practice-oriented legal writing courses include:
 
>Appellate Advocacy
>Legal Drafting (any section or specialty)
>A course that will meet the requirements for an Applied Legal Writing Portfolio
>VIS Competition
 
ii. A student must also complete one of the following to fulfill the second part of the writing requirement:
 
1. The courses in Law Journal Writing or Law Journal Editing.
 
2. Directed Research (DR). Any student enrolled in DR must attend a Seminar in Academic Legal Writing* that covers topics related to the writing process in order to receive a writing requirement credit. Writing requirement credit will not be posted for the DR unless the registrar receives verification that the student satisfactorily attended the academic writing seminar. The faculty member supervising the DR will be required to certify that each of the requirements of the Academic Rules has been met for each student using the DR to satisfy the writing requirement.
 
3. A Qualifying Course Paper (QP). Any student enrolled in a QP course must attend a Seminar in Academic Legal Writing* that covers topics related to the writing process. While credit for the course will be awarded when the faculty member submits the grade, the QP course will not count toward satisfaction of the writing requirement unless the registrar receives verification that the student satisfactorily attended the academic writing seminar. The faculty member supervising the QP will be required to certify that each of the requirements of the Academic Rules has been met for each student using the QP to satisfy the writing requirement.
 
4. The course in Advanced Legal Research and Writing.
* The Seminar in Academic Legal Writing will be a noncredit, three-hour seminar offered at the beginning of each semester.
 
3. Writing Project Categories and Specifications
 
a. Directed Research Project. Directed Research is a two-credit course.
 
i. A student may register either for two consecutive semesters (i.e., fall/spring; spring/fall; spring/summer; summer/fall) or for a single semester. In a two-semester project, the first semester should be devoted primarily to conducting research; the second semester should be devoted primarily to writing; the grade and credits will be awarded only upon the completion of the second semester. Note that both credits will be awarded for the same semester and will not be split between semesters.
 
ii. Although the page number requirement is left to the supervising instructor’s discretion, it is unlikely that a paper of acceptable quality could be done in fewer than 40 pages.
 
iii. To register for Directed Research the student must submit a topic statement signed by the supervising instructor, including the tentative research and writing schedule agreed to by the student and the instructor. At a minimum, this schedule should include dates for (1) the submission of a research bibliography; (2) submission of at least one substantially complete draft; (3) the return of the first draft to the student with extensive written comments; and (4) submission of a final paper that responds to the written comments. These stages, and any additional interim deadlines required by the supervising instructor, should be spread out over the semester or semesters for which the student is registered for the course.
 
iv. The customary due date for the submission of the final paper is the first day of the examination period for the semester in which the paper is due. Individual faculty members may, however, set an alternative deadline for any time up to but not past the last day of the examination period. Within this time period, each faculty member has the discretion to waive deadlines or to impose penalties for missed deadlines. If the final paper is not submitted by the end of the examination period, the instructor must enter a failing grade unless an incomplete is justified under Rule XI.
 
b. Qualifying Course Paper.
 
i. A qualifying course paper is one that satisfies the criteria in paragraph 2, written in conjunction with a seminar or other course with an enrollment of no more than 24 students. The instructor should publish to prospective students before commencement of the course the procedures to be followed and the criteria for the course paper. The student must submit a written statement of topic within the time designated by the instructor teaching the course (normally, within the first two weeks of the semester). The student and instructor shall then agree on a tentative schedule for submission of drafts and provision of feedback.
 
ii. An instructor may choose to require more than one paper to satisfy the course requirements. Although the page number requirement is left to the supervising instructor’s discretion, it is unlikely that a single paper of acceptable quality could be done in fewer than 25 pages, or a similar combined page count for multiple shorter papers.
 
c. Law Journal Writing Project or Law Journal Editing Project. The law journal writing project must be completed in combination with the course in Law Journal Writing, and the law journal editing projects must be completed in combination with the course in Law Journal Editing. Both courses are open only to members of the law school’s law journals. The requirements for these courses are specified in the respective course descriptions and include the following:
 
i. Law Journal Writing is open only to members of one of the law school’s law journals engaged in a writing project for the journal. The course is not mandatory for those journal members, but a student may not count a law journal writing project toward fulfillment of the writing requirement unless the student has enrolled in and completed all course requirements including completion and submission of the journal writing portfolio.
 
ii. Law Journal Editing is mandatory for third- and fourth-year law journal members who have responsibilities for supervising student writing projects, and only journal members enrolled in this course may supervise second- or third-year members who are enrolled in Law Journal Writing.
 
     A student may apply one or the other of these courses, but not both, toward fulfillment of the writing requirement.
 
     Each journal’s faculty adviser(s) must certify to the dean’s office students who have successfully completed writing or editing projects that meet the course requirements.
 
d. Appellate Advocacy. The brief writing project must satisfy the criteria in paragraph 2. Briefs completed in the Appellate Advocacy course may satisfy this requirement.
 
e. Advanced Legal Writing Course. This includes Advanced Legal Writing and Research, Legal Drafting, and similar courses that may be identified in the future, where the primary focus is the development of legal writing skills and the process of legal writing and where the writing projects meet the criteria in paragraph 2.
 
f. Applied Legal Writing Portfolio. This writing project option recognizes that writing skills may be developed by experience in creating legal documents as part of a law school course.
 
i. In conjunction with one or more courses the student must produce a portfolio of at least three (3) original written projects, each of which satisfies the criteria in paragraph 2. The written products may be a variety of documents, such as: (1) a legal opinion letter to a client; (2) a demand letter or similar communication to an opposing party or attorney; (3) a pleading; (4) a memorandum of points and authorities; (5) a proposed order of settlement; (6) a contract, lease, license, or similar agreement; (7) an appellate brief; (8) comments on draft legislation or a proposed agency rule; (9) a will or trust agreement; (10) a proposed statute or agency rule; (11) or any other legal writing that is neither boilerplate nor substantially rewritten by an instructor.
 
ii. Each written product submitted as part of the applied legal writing portfolio must be of high quality and reflect substantial analytical and writing work, but need not be of any particular length.
 
iii. Each writing included in the portfolio must be accompanied by a certification from the supervising instructor that it satisfies these requirements. The completed portfolio and accompanying certificates must be submitted to the law school registrar in order to receive credit toward the upper-level writing requirement.
 
 
 
All students are required to take at least one professional skills course prior to graduation. Professional Skills courses in our curriculum include Alternative Dispute Resolution Techniques; Appellate Advocacy; CCLS Clinics; Innocence Project Clinic and Clemency Project; Interviewing, Counseling and Negotiating Skills; Mediation and Arbitration Skills; Mediation Skills; Law Students in Court; Legal Drafting; Pre-Trial Litigation; Trial Advocacy; Trial Practice; Trial Skills; and Vis International Arbitration Moot Court.
 
 
All students who enroll in fall 2013 and subsequently are required to take at least one transition to practice course prior to graduation. 
 
 
All students are required to attend six professional education programs prior to graduation. Further information on these programs is set forth in the Rules of Professional Conduct for Law Students. 
 
 
Each student’s file, containing material from application through graduation, is maintained in the law school. Information in the file is available to the student upon written request, consistent with the requirements imposed on the law school by CUA and by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (Buckley Amendment). The student record policy is online at http://policies.cua.edu/StudentLife/studentrecords.cfm
 
Student education records will not be disclosed without written permission of the student unless the release fits one of the exceptions in the CUA Student Records Policy, online at http://policies.cua.edu/studentlife/studentrecordsfull.cfm.
 
Permanent and official transcripts of law school work are maintained in the CUA enrollment services office in McMahon Hall. All requests for transcripts should be made to that office or through Cardinal Station.
 
 
Matriculated students are expected to take all their courses in the law school. In circumstances related to family, health, and other unusual personal situations, the associate dean for academic affairs may permit a student to visit at another law school for not more than two semesters. Upon application to the associate dean for academic affairs, a student may be permitted to visit at another school for no more than one semester to participate in a program for academic and professional advancement at another institution, if the program is not available at this law school and if the program is rigorous. The time away from the law school may not exceed two semesters.
 
A student who visits another school must pay a “transient student fee” to cover administrative expenses and will receive credit only for courses in which a satisfactory grade (The equivalent of C or better according to the grading scale of the visited school) has been received. Such credits will satisfy degree requirements (credit hours and residency), but no grades will be entered on the student’s permanent record. The grades earned will not be included in the student’s cumulative average and class rank. Students must earn a minimum of 56 credit hours at CUA to be ranked at graduation.
Except for students transferring from another approved law school or for students in joint degree programs, no credit toward the J.D. degree can be given for coursework done prior to matriculation in this law school. For students enrolled in joint degree programs, the law school will accept 12 credits taken at the other school. During semesters when students are taking courses tuition will be determined in the usual CUA manner for joint degree candidates.
 
Within the limits of maximum course load (Academic Rule II.2, supra), students may request permission from the Academic Dean to take courses relating to the law in other schools or departments of CUA for credit toward their J.D. degree. No more than three such courses will be approved.   Students should arrange for permission to take courses in the school or department before registration. Grades in such courses will be entered on the students’ record but will not be computed into their academic average. Note: The limitation to three courses does not apply to joint degree candidates.
Also within the limits of maximum course load, students may request permission to take courses at other law schools for credit toward their CUA degrees. Such permission will not be given unless the course is not offered at the law school, or unless the student cannot take and could not have taken the course at the law school prior to graduation. The other law school shall set standards for admission and the tuition fees for their courses. Only courses in which satisfactory grades (the equivalent of C or better according to the grading scale of the visited school) are earned will be credited toward degree requirements here.
 
 
 
1. Approval will not be given for students to take courses elsewhere that are required courses here, or that will be offered here during the remainder of the student’s program of studies.
 
2. Upon timely application to the Office of the Academic Dean, a student may be permitted to participate in another law school’s structured summer program abroad or intersession program where the program offers unusual academic, professional or cultural enrichment, even if the program includes non-required courses that are or may be offered here.
 
3. Students employed more than 20 hours per week in the summer will not be authorized to take at another law school any combination of courses or credit hours, which require more than 10 classroom hours per week.
 
4. No transfer credit will be given for summer or intersession coursework at another law school unless the student earns a grade that is satisfactory according to the standards of that law school. Students are responsible for seeing that transcripts of summer or intersession work are forwarded promptly to the Registrar.
 
5. Summer or intersession courses at other law schools will not count toward CUA residency requirements.
 
6. Approval will not be given for summer or intersession courses, which will officially begin or conclude during the regular law school year.
 
 
A student in good standing who must interrupt his/her studies for adequate reason, such as health or military service, may be granted an academic leave for a stated period, usually not to exceed one year. The student should apply in writing to the Office of the Academic Dean of the Law School, stating the specific reasons for requiring the leave.
The period of academic leave is counted as part of the time allowed for the completion of degree requirements. All degree requirements must be completed within 84 months after the student has commenced law study. Any incomplete (I) grades that are outstanding must be changed in accordance with the policy on incomplete grades by the date published in the Academic Calendar, whether a student is registered for the current semester or not. If the academic leave extends beyond the period approved by the academic dean, the student will be considered to have withdrawn from CUA, and must apply for readmission to be reinstated and satisfy current degree requirements.
Students may apply for an academic leave for a semester if they are not enrolled in courses for that semester up until administrative withdrawals are processed for that term (usually the last date to enroll in any class offered for that semester [including modular, i.e. dynamically dated, classes]).
 
Students who wish to temporarily leave CUA during a semester in which they are enrolled in classes will receive a term withdrawal for that term. An additional request will need to be made if the student wishes to extend the leave into a future semester. This extension will be considered an academic leave subject to the terms stated above. The Office of the Academic Dean notifies the offices of the law school registrar and the law school financial aid office of this action. The student will receive confirmation of the approved action from the Office of the Academic Dean once finalized. A residential student granted an academic leave or term withdrawal must also cancel his/her housing agreement with housing services.
 
a. Academic Leave
 
An academic leave, if granted, will be effective as of the last day of the semester in which a student was most recently enrolled.
Students on Academic Leave are expected to return to CUA when their stated duration of leave has expired. Students who do not return from an Academic Leave when scheduled will be subject to Administrative Withdrawal during the semester for which they failed to return.
 
b. Term Withdrawal
 
i. During Drop/Add Period — Students enrolled in classes who subsequently drop all their classes within the drop/add period will be considered to be on a term withdrawal, effective as of the date they notify the Office of the Academic Dean or the date they drop from the last class in which they are enrolled if they do not notify CUA. They will receive a notation on their transcript that they dropped every class in which they were enrolled, and are subject to the tuition refund schedule policy.
 
Students who drop all classes without notifying the Office of the Academic Dean will be deemed to have withdrawn from the academic program. Students seeking to drop all courses for the semester must notify the Office of the Academic Dean. If the separation is expected to go beyond the start of the next semester, they must apply for an Academic Leave (see above).
 
ii. After End of Drop/Add Period — Students who are currently enrolled in classes and who decide to withdraw from all their classes after the last day of drop/add will be considered to be on a term withdrawal, effective as of the date they notify CUA or the date they withdraw from the last class in which they are enrolled if they do not notify CUA. They will receive a grade of “W” in every class in which they were enrolled, and are subject to the tuition refund schedule policy.
 
NOTE: Students on Term Withdrawal (Official or Unofficial) or Academic Leave will be reported to the National Student Clearinghouse as "not enrolled" with an effective date as noted above. Recipients of federal student loans will enter their loan grace period, and if they have previously used up their loan grace period, will immediately enter into loan repayment. “Official” means that the student notified CUA; “Unofficial” means that the student did not notify CUA, but stopped attending all the courses in which they were enrolled.
 
c. Permanent Withdrawal
Law students who no longer wish to continue to study at the law school should notify the Office of the Academic Dean of the Law School. Students who make the decision to leave before finishing the semester in which they are enrolled will be withdrawn as of the date they notify the administration. For those students who inform the law school of their intent to withdraw for a future semester, the withdrawal date will be the last day of the semester in which they are currently enrolled.
 
Students who withdraw from CUA during a semester in which they are enrolled are subject to the tuition refund schedule policy regardless of the reasons for their withdrawal. Exceptions to the refund schedule will be considered by the Withdrawal Committee (dean of students, associate vice president of enrollment services, director of financial aid, academic representative appointed by the provost). Students who withdraw during a semester will receive a “W” grade in each class in which they were registered.
 
Students who do not enroll in CUA for a given semester and do not inform CUA of their intentions to leave on a temporary or permanent basis will be administratively withdrawn from CUA as of the last date to enroll in any class offered for that semester (including modular, i.e. dynamically dated, classes).
 
Students who have withdrawn from CUA will be reported to the National Student Clearinghouse as "not enrolled" with an effective date as noted above. They will enter their federal student loan grace period, and if they have previously used up their student loan grace period, they will immediately enter into loan repayment.
 
If a student who has withdrawn from the law school subsequently decides to return to the law school, he/she must submit an application for admission to the law school Office of Admissions. That application will be considered as an application to the first-year class. Credits earned prior to withdrawal from the law school cannot be applied to a subsequent application for admission.
 
 
 
Students in the law school are subject to the Standards of Student Conduct as set out in the CUA Policies and Procedures Affecting Students and to the jurisdiction of the Student Judiciary. All members of the law school community are subject to the provisions of the Rules of Professional Conduct for Law Students.
 
 
Students contemplating taking any bar examination should check the requirements carefully to ensure that their academic programs conform to any special rules. Some states require registration with the bar examiners while still a law student. Some states require specific coursework before a law school graduate may take the bar examination.
 
 
Students who elect to participate in approved studies or activities away from the law school, or in a format that does not involve attendance at regularly scheduled class sessions, may use such time spent to satisfy the law school’s residency and credit hour requirements, provided the conditions of this section are met.
 
1. At least 65 credits of the total credited toward satisfying the “in residence” and “credit hour” requirements for graduation shall be in actual attendance in regularly scheduled class sessions in this law school or, with the dean’s approval, at another law school.
 
2. The remaining hours may be earned for other studies or activities such as clinical fieldwork (see section XXIV), directed research (see section XIII), participation in moot court and law review, and courses relating to law taken outside the law school (see section XVIII). (Students should be aware that state bars may have a more stringent requirement for credit hours earned in classes with regularly scheduled classroom sessions, and thus they should become acquainted with the specific requirements of any state in which they may wish to practice).
 
 
With regard to clinical courses, the Announcements of the law school shall designate how much credit is given for regularly scheduled classroom sessions and how much credit is given for other studies and activities including fieldwork. (See section XXIII on maximum credit that may be obtained for studies and activities outside regularly scheduled classroom activities). No more than one course designated as a clinical offering may be taken per semester without prior approval.
 
 
Under certain circumstances, the law school will accept academic credit earned at another ABA accredited law school for transfer to CUA. Only graded courses will be considered for transfer (no pass/fail classes will be accepted for transfer). The grade received in the class must be a C or better to qualify for academic credit. If courses are accepted for transfer, the credit will transfer but the grade will not transfer nor will it be included in the CUA Law grade-point average. This rule summarizes the situations in which credit may transfer and the criteria used to determine whether the credit will transfer and limits on credit transfer.
 
1. Students Seeking to Transfer from Another ABA accredited law school to CUA.
 
     CUA welcomes applications from students at other ABA accredited law schools who seek to complete their work at CUA and receive the J.D. from CUA. When a transfer application is accepted, the prior law schoolwork is reviewed to determine what credit will transfer. CUA will accept a maximum of 28 credits, with a grade of C (or equivalent) or above, in courses that CUA requires in the first year of law school (or a close equivalent). Also:
 
a. We will accept no more credits for a specific course than we offer, i.e., if the former law school awarded six credits for Torts, we will only transfer the four credits that Torts earns here.
 
b. If the former law school awards fewer credits than we do for a specific class, then the smaller number of credits will transfer, i.e., if the former law school awarded four credits for Contracts, we will only transfer the four credits awarded at that law school.
 
c. We will not accept credits for part one of a two-part class if the second part has not been taken. For example, if the former law school offered Constitutional Law I in first year for three credits, and a required Constitutional Law II in second year for three credits, we will not accept the credits from part one alone.
 
2. Students Who Attend an Approved Summer Abroad Program. Current CUA law students may seek permission under Academic Rule XIX to attend summer law school classes at other ABA Accredited Law Schools or at Summer Abroad programs of other ABA-accredited law schools. With that prior approval:
 
a. We will accept no more than five credits in one summer from any program other than our own program (domestic or study abroad).
 
b. We will not accept credits from multiple summer law school programs.
 
c. Summer courses at other law schools will not count toward CUA residency requirements.
 
3. Students Who Attend Courses Outside the Law School During the Regular Law School Year.
 
     Current CUA law students may seek permission under Academic Rule XVIII to visit away at another ABA-accredited law school or to attend one or more individual courses at another ABA-accredited law school or to take classes relating to the law in other schools or departments of CUA for credit toward their J.D. degree. With that prior approval:
 
a. We will generally accept no more than 28 credits from law schools other than CUA, nor more than one academic year’s worth of work from a law school other than CUA.
 
b. We expect students to meet our specific course requirements at CUA (Professional Responsibility, the Upper-Division Writing Requirement, and the Professional Skills Requirement). If students have not met the requirements for Professional Responsibility, the Upper-Division Writing Requirement and the Professional Skills Requirement, they must receive specific written approval from the academic dean’s office for the course(s) that will meet those requirements at the visited law school.
 
c. We strongly recommend that students not visit away in the final semester of law school. However, if a final semester visit away is approved, the student is on notice that we must have official notice of grades from the visited law school prior to the date on which the faculty votes on the graduating class. If the grades are not received prior to the faculty vote, the student will not graduate with the graduating class.
 
4. Students in “Exchange” Programs Where a Specific Agreement has Been Made Between CUA and Another ABA Accredited Law School.
 
CUA may enter into an agreement with another law school to allow students of one law school to visit at the other law school under certain conditions. CUA currently has no exchange agreements in place.
 
 
 
Graduates of foreign law programs may apply for admission to the J.D. program with Advanced Standing. Students may receive credit for up to one third of the required credits for the CUA J.D. (up to a maximum of 28 credits) from prior legal studies in a foreign country. The total amount of credit allowed will be determined on an individual basis. The ABA Standards for the Approval of Law Schools govern advanced standing credit for applicants who have graduated from foreign law programs. The coursework in the foreign law program must have been done “in residence” at the foreign law program and CUA must be satisfied that the quality of the educational program at the foreign program was at least equal to that of an ABA accredited law school. Students who receive advanced standing credit must complete the remaining two-thirds of the work for the J.D. in residence at CUA.
 
 
As an American Bar Association (ABA) accredited law school, the Columbus School of Law is subject to the ABA Standards for Approval of Law Schools. The ABA Standards may be found at http://www.americanbar.org/groups/legal_education/resources/standards.html. Any student at the law school who wishes to assert a complaint regarding the law school’s compliance with the ABA’s Accreditation Standards should submit that complaint in writing to the law school assistant dean for academic affairs.
 
1. Reporting the Complaint
A student asserting a complaint regarding the law school’s compliance with the ABA’s Accreditation Standards should submit the complaint in writing, with sufficient detail to permit the law school to investigate the matter, including the specific Accreditation Standard(s) at issue. The complaint must be signed by the student. The complaint must also include the student’s contact information, including name, home and email addresses, and phone number.
 
2. Resolving the Complaint
When a formal written complaint has been made in accordance with paragraph 1, the assistant dean for academic affairs will:
 
a. Acknowledge receipt of the complaint within five (5) business days of receipt,
 
b. Investigate the complaint and attempt to resolve it within thirty (30) business days. Within the thirty (30) day period the assistant dean will either meet with the complaining student, or respond to the substance of the complaint in writing. During the meeting, or in the written response, the student shall either receive a substantive response to the complaint, or information about what steps are being taken by the law school to address or further investigate the complaint. If further investigation is needed, the student shall be provided with information about what steps are being taken by the law school to obtain the information and the anticipated timeframe for additional response.
 
c. If, due to extraordinary circumstances, the law school is unable to meet these timeframes, the dean may authorize an extension of time and the student will be notified of the extension and the reason for the extension.
 
3. Appeals
Within ten (10) business days of written notice from the assistant dean for academic affairs regarding final resolution of the complaint, the student may appeal the decision in writing to the dean of the law school. If such appeal is filed, the dean shall respond, with a written decision, within thirty (30) business days. The decision of the dean shall be final.
 
4. Written Record of Complaints
The Office of the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs in the law school shall maintain a complete written record of each complaint and how it was investigated and resolved

 

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ACADEMIC RULES

LL.M. PROGRAM

 
The academic rules at the date of publication are listed below. From time to time the faculty may promulgate new rules or alter the present rules. Students are considered to be on notice of changes or additions to these rules when they are approved by the faculty and posted in the Announcements as well as on the Web site of The Catholic University of America Columbus School of Law. To the extent permitted, in extraordinary cases, exceptions to these rules may be granted by the academic dean(s) for good cause shown.
 
To be eligible for the degree of Legum Magister (LL.M.), with a concentration in Communications Law, Securities Law, or Comparative and International Law, a student must complete the following requirements during a course of study not to exceed 36 months after the student has commenced LL.M. study:
 
1. Earn at least 24 semester hours of credit while maintaining a cumulative average of 2.15;
 
2. Earn at least 16 of the required credits in courses directly related to the concentration area; the remaining credits may be earned by taking general electives.
 
3. Required Courses

a. LL.M. students with a U.S. or Canadian first degree are required to take at least one course with a writing component as part of their coursework.
 
b. LL.M. students whose first degree in law is not from a U.S. or Canadian school (“International students”) must take a legal research and writing course that will familiarize them with the American legal system and ensure proficiency in American legal analysis and writing.
 
c. International students may be required to take a first-year common law course and they are encouraged to select at least one additional upper-division course that requires completion of a paper or other written work product.
 
4. Students must complete a written academic plan, under the supervision of the faculty adviser, prior to commencing study. Note: J.D. students will have priority for limited enrollment courses.
To be eligible for the nonresident Master of Laws (LL.M.) Program with Jagiellonian University, students must earn 22 credit hours. The program comprises three parts:
 
• At least six credits earned in three courses taken within the International Business and Trade Law Program offered by CUA in Cracow in mid-June through the end of July in the first summer in which students are enrolled in the program. LL.M. students study with American law students and students from several law schools in Poland.
 
• At least nine credits earned in the School of American Law held at Jagiellonian University in Cracow during the academic year between October and May.
 
• Six to seven credits earned during a two-month stay in Washington, D.C., from mid-May through the end of July during the second summer that students are enrolled in the program. Students enroll in one three- or four-credit classroom substantive law course. In addition, students receive one credit for a course in advanced legal research and writing, which assists them with the preparation of a required directed research paper, for which the student receives an additional two credits.
 
1. Students must complete registration at the beginning of each semester.
 
2. Students may be admitted as full-time or part-time students.
Full-
time students must enroll for a minimum of 12 hours per semester and should complete the program in one academic year. Full-time students may enroll for a maximum of 16 credits per semester. Part-time students must enroll for a minimum of six credits per semester and should complete the program in two academic years. Part-time students may enroll for a maximum of 11 credits per semester. Students who are working more than 20 hours per week should enroll in the part-time program. LL.M. students may not exceed the maximum period of candidacy described in Rule I.
 
3. International students on student visas are required to enroll as full-time students. A student’s visa cannot be extended to provide additional time for the student to complete a paper or coursework except for compelling academic or medical reasons consistent with U.S. visa regulations. Other students with a first degree from an institution outside of the U.S. may enroll as part-time students if they are U.S. citizens or permanent residents of the U.S., or if they are on a visa permitting part-time study.
 
4. Late registration is permitted only for good cause.
Students who register after the deadline may incur a late registration fee. No course may be added after the add/drop deadline.
 
5. Permission to change the chosen concentration or to withdraw from any course must be approved by the faculty adviser and the academic dean.
 
6. Duplication of Courses. Students in the LL.M. program may not enroll in the same or a substantially similar course for which they have previously received academic credit without written authorization from the faculty adviser and the academic dean. If such permission is granted, the faculty adviser and the academic dean must confirm, in writing, whether the course in question will count toward the credits required for the degree and/or concentration.
 
7. Withdrawal from a course after the drop/add period but before mid-semester is permitted, but will not be allowed if the student’s amended course load would be less than the minimum number of hours specified in paragraph II, 2. supra. The withdrawal will be noted on the transcript. After mid-semester a withdrawal may be authorized by the academic dean only with the concurrence of the course instructor. In no event will withdrawals be authorized after the beginning of the official examination period for that semester. Changing from credit to audit must be done before the midpoint of the semester.
 
 8. Transfers between divisions (full-time/part-time) are permitted only for good cause and with written application to the academic dean. Normally a student will be permitted to transfer only once during his or her LL.M. study.
 
9. Withdrawal for failure to register.
A student who fails either to register or to obtain an approved leave of absence, regardless of the reason for that failure, will be withdrawn from the LL.M. program. This action will be noted on the student’s transcript. Such a student may not register for a subsequent semester without the approval of the academic dean. Permission to re-enroll will not be granted unless the degree can be completed within 36 months of the original date of matriculation.
 
 
1. Grading Policy for LL.M Students

a. Grades for all LL.M. students will be based on the following letter-grade scale:
A+                       
A, A-   
B+, B, B-            
C+, C                  
C-, D                  
F                           Failing
F*                         Administrative Failure
   The grade of F* should be awarded to students who did not officially withdraw from the course, but who failed to attend and participate in course activities through the end of the period.
 
b. Letter-based grades will be converted to numerical values for the purposes of calculation of grade point average as follows: A+ = 4.33; A = 4.0; A- = 3.67; B+ = 3.33; B = 3.0; B- = 2.67;
C+ = 2.33; C = 2.0; C- = 1.67; D = 1.0; F = 0.0; F*=0.0
 
c. No mandatory means or medians shall apply to grades awarded to LL.M. students. The grade ranges set out for J.D. students may be used to guide the assignment of grades for LL.M. students, however, such grades ranges are merely advisory.
 
d. The performance of LL.M. students shall be evaluated independently from the evaluation of J.D. students. LL.M. students shall not be included when determining the means, medians, or ranking for J.D. students. Every effort will be made to maintain an LL.M. student’s anonymity during the grading process; however anonymity cannot be guaranteed when enrollment numbers of LL.M. students in a course make such anonymity infeasible.
 
2. Procedure for Appealing Failing Grade.

Find the procedure at http://policies.cua.edu/academicundergrad/
appealfailinggrades.cfm
. University procedure does not allow a passing grade to be appealed.
 
1. Good Standing:

LLM students must maintain a cumulative average of 2.15.
 
2. Academic Probation

     An LL.M. student whose cumulative average falls below 2.15, but not below 1.82 after the first semester in a full-time program or first or second semester in a part-time program will be placed on academic probation.
 
3. Academic Exclusion

     A student will be academically excluded from the LL.M. degree program under any one of the following circumstances:
 
a. The LL.M. student has been placed on academic probation and fails to achieve a cumulative grade point average of 2.15 or higher in the subsequent semester.
 
b. The LL.M. student’s cumulative grade point average falls below 1.82 in any semester.
 
c. Upon completion of all degree requirements the LL.M. student has not achieved a cumulative grade point average of 2.15 or higher.
 
4. Readmission Following Exclusion
 
a. Absent extraordinary circumstances, students excluded for academic deficiency will not be readmitted to the law school.                      
b. An excluded student may be considered for readmission only once.
 
c. As a rule, the faculty excludes the votes of student representatives to the faculty and to the Student Affairs Committee on matters pertaining to a student’s petition for readmission. However, upon written request of the student seeking readmission, student representatives will be permitted to vote on the petition.
 
 d. If the Student Affairs Committee votes to readmit an LL.M. student following exclusion, the committee, in conjunction with the LL.M. student’s faculty adviser, must specify requirements for the student’s continued study, including retaking any specific courses or revising the academic plan.
 
 e. An LL.M. student readmitted following academic exclusion must achieve a semester average of 2.15 in the following semester and a cumulative average of 2.15 upon completion of all degree requirements. If the student does not achieve a semester average of 2.15 in the following semester the student will be excluded from the academic program without opportunity for academic probation or readmission.
 
1. Class Attendance

Regular and punctual attendance at class meetings or equivalent course exercises is a condition of receiving credit in all courses. If a student misses more than two hours of coursework for each credit hour assigned to the course, the instructor may direct the dean’s office to exclude the student from the course. Instructors in limited-enrollment courses (seminars, clinics, simulations, etc.) may set stricter attendance rules for those courses, including required attendance at the first or other specified class meetings; if a student fails to meet these requirements, the instructor may direct the dean’s office to exclude the student from the course. Each instructor is responsible for announcing and enforcing the specific attendance policy for that course. Chronic, repeated, or general lack of attendance in violation of these rules shall be grounds for dismissal from the school upon a vote of the faculty. (See Rule III.1. Grades.)
 
2. Course Requirements

Individual instructors are free to determine their own teaching method and materials and whether their course grade will be based on examination, a research paper, or a combination of the two, or pursuant to Rule VI. Individual instructors also may designate prerequisites for their courses.
 
 
1. Except as provided below in sections 2–4, each student’s grade shall be based solely on an anonymous written examination administered at the end of the course pursuant to Rule VII.
 
2. Courses Exempt by Category

     Clinical courses, externship courses, simulated lawyering skills courses, seminars, and all courses that satisfy a writing requirement are not governed by paragraph 1. Instructors in those courses may base their grades on criteria established by the individual instructors. The criteria must be set forth in writing and distributed to the students in the course at or before the first class meeting.
 
3. Instructor Option re Student Work Product

a. In any course other than those listed in paragraph 2, at the instructor’s option up to 30 percent of the final grade may be based on student work product other than the final examination.
 
b. The student work product that comprises the nonexamination portion of the final grade may consist of answers to written problems; research or drafting assignments; periodic quizzes; a mid-semester test; classroom demonstrations, presentations or reports; individual or team exercises such as simulations of interviews, depositions, arguments, hearings, negotiations, or the like; or any other activity during the semester that can be objectively assessed and compared from one student to another.
 
c. Any instructor intending to base a portion of the grade on student work product other than a final examination must make that election, set forth the criteria for the grade in writing, and distribute it to the students in the course at or before the first class meeting. No nonexamination grading component criteria may be added by the instructor after the initial distribution of the criteria to the students. Previously announced nonexamination grading criteria may be eliminated or changed by the instructor so long as the change is made in writing and distributed to the students before the last day of classes.

d. When the final grades are submitted to the dean’s office, the instructor must submit a written worksheet or compilation that identifies the nonexamination component(s) for each student.
 
e. The instructor should grade the nonexamination components on an anonymous basis, whenever feasible, especially in firstyear courses.
 
4. Instructor Option re Classroom Performance

At the instructor’s option, assessment of classroom performance, which includes participation in class discussions and in-class exercises other than those listed in Paragraph 3, may raise or lower a student’s grade for the course by a single letter-grade step. A single letter-grade step change is a change from an A to an A+ or A-, from a B+ to an A- or B, etc. No grade of D or F may, however, be created or altered though an addition of or subtraction of a step as provided in this section
 
Anonymous written examinations are conducted in all courses at the end of each semester, except as provided in Rule VI.
 
1. Time and Place for Examinations

     Examinations will be administered, according to a posted schedule, in a special period following the end of all regular class meetings. All exams must be taken during that period unless incompletes are entered for good cause. The posted schedule designates specific starting times for exams and will be issued in draft form no later than the beginning of the semester. Examinations that deviate from the time limits set in paragraph 3 below must be identified at that time. Exam questions are distributed by proctors. Students will be assigned to specific rooms, must take every other (alternate) seat in the classroom assigned, and must write the examination in that room.
 
2. Proctors

     Faculty members or others hired for the purpose will be assigned as proctors for each room in which examinations are being taken. Proctors will distribute and collect exams in the assigned room and will remain in the room during the exam.
 
3. Time Limits

     Examinations may be one to four hours’ duration, at the instructor’s discretion. Except in required courses, if an examination will exceed the four-hour limit, students must be advised of that fact no later than the inception of registration. The amount of time allowed will be stated on the examination itself, and this time is absolute. At the stated expiration time, all students must turn in their exams promptly to the proctor. The proctor is instructed to notify the Office of the Dean regarding the examination papers of students who continue to write past the time limit. Any student who is unavoidably late for the beginning of an examination may see the dean or the dean's designee, who may extend the deadline for that student for sufficient reason. Otherwise, a late-arriving student is limited to the original deadline set for the exam. Similarly, students who become ill during an exam should report the illness to the proctor. The proctor will collect that student’s examination materials and will report the illness to the dean, who may extend the deadline or reschedule the exam.
 
4. Rescheduling of Examinations

a. Students may request rescheduling of examinations on account of personal or family illness or emergency or an exam conflict. Any rescheduling will be to the nearest possible date following the originally scheduled date at which all other rescheduled students will be available to take the examination. No examination will be rescheduled to a time prior to the time at which the examination period starts. Examinations will not be advanced except in extraordinary circumstances. With regards to any exam rescheduled in advance of a regularly scheduled exam, faculty members will be consulted prior to the Office of Academic Affairs making such accommodations.
 
b. If a student has examinations on three consecutive days, the middle exam may be rescheduled.
 
c. If a student has two exams in one day, he or she may reschedule one.
 
d. If a student has two exams in less than 48 hours (the 48-hour period is computed from the starting time for each exam), one exam will be rescheduled so that the exams will be at least 48 hours apart.
 
e. Reasons of personal convenience, including matters relating to employment, do not warrant rescheduling examinations.
 
f. The instructor will be advised whenever a student takes his or her exam at a rescheduled time, and the instructor may prepare a special exam for that purpose.
 
g. Take-home exams and paper due dates are excluded from rescheduling consideration.
 
5. Failure to Appear for Scheduled Examination

Any student who, without approved rescheduling, fails to appear for an examination at the time scheduled will receive an F for that exam.
 
6. General Examination Format

Examinations in the law school will consist of a series of questions or problems dealing with the subject matter of the course. In preparing such examinations, instructors may designate the weight- or time allocation for each question or problem.
 
7. Take-Home Examinations

     An instructor may give a take-home examination in any course. Take-home exams should be distributed and returned at fixed times, and the time allotted should be neither so short nor so long as to interfere with other examinations being administered. Policies stated above with respect to deadlines, and failure to appear apply to take-home exams as well as to regular exams. In giving take-home exams, instructors should appreciate the limited resources of the law library, should avoid using the take-home format as a substitute for a term research paper, and should presume that the exam can be answered from required course materials. Take-home exams should be in the same format as regular exams and should be returnable within a maximum of 48 hours after distribution. The instructor should specify appropriate amounts of time for preparing and writing exam answers and should set maximum page or word limits for the exam.
 
8. Materials in Examination Rooms

     Instructors should announce in class, advise the proctor, and indicate on the examination questions what (if any) materials students may bring into the examination room. Any other notes, books, or materials must be left outside the room during the exam.
 
9. Anonymity of Examinations

     Examinations are taken and graded anonymously. Students are responsible for obtaining exam numbers according to procedures set by the dean’s office. Students must identify their exams only with their exam number. To preserve grading anonymity, students are prohibited from contacting current semester faculty between the date that the exam is administered and the date that the grades are posted in Cardinal Station.
 
10. Review of Exams C+ or Below

     Every student who has received the grade of C+ or below in any course is required to review the examination and the model answer the professor has prepared for that examination and discuss the review with the professor. For a grade received in the spring term, this review must occur no later than four weeks after the start of fall classes. For a grade received in the fall term, this review must occur no later than six weeks after the start of spring classes. No student obligated to review an examination by this resolution will be permitted to register for courses taken in the semester subsequent to the semester when the grade was posted unless the student provides the Office of the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs a statement, signed by the professor assigning the grade of C+ or less, confirming the obligation created by this resolution has been satisfied. The limitation on registering for courses shall apply up to, but not including, the registration period for courses to be taken in the last semester of the students' legal study.
 
1. Students in all courses are expected to complete their coursework within the semester in which the course is offered.

In examination courses this means taking the exam at the time scheduled. In courses in which research papers comprise all or part of the coursework, such papers must be submitted at the times fixed by the instructor but in no event later than the last day of scheduled exams for the semester.
 
2. When a student is unable, because of illness or other hardship, to complete coursework (other than the examination) on the due date(s), the student should advise the instructor promptly.

The instructor may then direct the entry of a grade of incomplete in the course. Incomplete grades must be made up at a time determined by the instructor and, in any event, no later than the middle of the following semester. Incomplete grades will be used rarely and only in extraordinary cases and will not be used when the student simply has failed to complete course work. No incomplete may be entered in the summer session. Failure to complete coursework on the due date or, in the case of an incomplete, by the middle of the following semester, will result in the entry of an F.
 
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1. Availability of Grades

    Final coursework grades are available through Cardinal Students.
 
2. Grade changes in any course are considered final once submitted to the Office of the Dean.

The Office of the Dean may change an otherwise final grade only on written certification from the faculty member either (1) that the final grade reflects an incorrect mathematical computation or recordation or (2) that, in determining the particular exam or paper grade, the faculty member evaluated the student’s work differently from that of all others in the course. (The latter criterion does not contemplate changes in the classroom performance [Rule VI.4] portion of any final grade). No final grade will be changed merely to restore a student to good standing, to assure academic credit for the course, at this institution or any other; nor will a grade be changed because, on review, the faculty member is persuaded the student had a better (or worse) grasp of the course material than the exam or paper evidenced on its face. In no event may any final grade be changed unless the faculty member’s written certification reaches the Office of the Dean by the middle of the semester following that for which the grade was entered.
 
3. Submission of grades by faculty members.

Faculty members are expected to submit grades as soon as possible. Absent an extension from the dean, grades are to be submitted no later than four weeks from the conclusion of the examination period. In order to award honors at graduation, grades of graduating students in their last semester must be submitted at a time to be designated by the dean.
                   
Writing requirements for LL.M. degree candidates are outlined in Rule I. 3. b and c.
 
Each student’s file, containing material from application through graduation, is maintained in the law school. Information in the file is available to the student upon written request, consistent with the requirements imposed on the law school by the University and
by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974
(Buckley Amendment). The student record policy is online at
http://policies.cua.edu/StudentLife/studentrecords.cfm. Student education records will not be disclosed without written permission of the student unless the release fits one of the exceptions in the CUA Student Records Policy found at http://policies.cua.edu/studentlife/studentrecordsfull.cfm. Permanent and official transcripts of law school work are maintained in the university enrollment services office in McMahon Hall. All requests for transcripts should be made to that office or on line through Cardinal Station.
 
LL.M. students are expected to complete all degree requirements at this University. In appropriate circumstances, however, students may be permitted to take one graduate level course (not to exceed four credits) relating to the academic program at another university. Similarly, within the limits of maximum course load, LL.M. students may request permission to take graduate level courses relating to the academic program in other schools or departments within The Catholic University of America for credit toward their LL.M. degree. Generally students will not be permitted to register for more than two courses in other CUA schools or departments. Courses taken outside of the law school (whether at CUA or at another university) must be included in the student’s written academic plan and approved by the faculty adviser. Credit in such courses will be entered on the student’s record but grades in these courses will not be computed into his or her academic average.
 
Students who seek accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act should contact the Office of Disability Support Services (DSS) at cua-disabilityservices@cua.edu, which will coordinate with the Office of the Academic Dean.
 
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A student in good standing who must interrupt his/her studies for adequate reason, such as prolonged ill health or military service, may be granted an academic leave for a stated period, usually not to exceed one year. The student should apply in writing to the Office of the Academic Dean of the law school, stating the specific reasons for requiring the leave.
 
The period of academic leave is counted as part of the time allowed for the completion of degree requirements. Any incomplete (I) grades that are outstanding must be changed in accordance with the policy on incomplete grades by the date published in the Academic Calendar, whether a student is registered for the current semester or not. If the academic leave extends beyond the period approved by the academic dean, the student will be considered to have withdrawn from the University, and must apply for readmission to be reinstated and satisfy current degree requirements.
 
Students may apply for an academic leave for a semester if they are not enrolled in courses for that semester up until administrative withdrawals are processed for that term (usually the last date to enroll in any class offered for that semester [including modular, i.e. dynamically dated, classes]).
 
Students who wish to temporarily leave the University during a semester in which they are enrolled in classes will receive a term withdrawal for that term. An additional request will need to be made if the student wishes to extend the leave into a future semester. This extension will be considered an academic leave subject to the terms stated above. The Office of the Academic Dean notifies the offices of the law school registrar and the law school financial aid office of this action. The student will receive confirmation of the approved action from the Office of the Academic Dean once finalized. A residential student granted an academic leave or term withdrawal must also cancel his/her housing agreement with housing services.
 
a. Academic Leave
An academic leave, if granted, will be effective as of the last day of the semester in which they were most recently enrolled.
Students on academic leave are expected to return to the University when their stated duration of leave has expired. Students who do not return from an academic leave when scheduled will be subject to Administrative Withdrawal during the semester for which they failed to return.
 
b. Term Withdrawal
 
i. During Drop/Add Period — Students enrolled in classes who subsequently drop all their classes within the drop/add period will be considered to be on a term withdrawal, effective as of the date they notify the Office of the Academic Dean or the date they drop from the last class in which they are enrolled if they do not notify the University. They will receive a notation on their transcript that they dropped every class in which they were enrolled, and are subject to the tuition refund schedule policy.
 
Students who drop all classes without notifying the Office of the Academic Dean will be deemed to have withdrawn from the academic program. Students seeking to drop all courses for the semester must notify the Office of the Academic Dean. If the separation is expected to go beyond the start of the next semester, they must apply for an academic leave (see above).
 
ii. After End of Drop/Add Period — Students who are currently enrolled in classes and who decide to withdraw from all their classes after the last day of drop/add will be considered to be on a term withdrawal, effective as of the date they notify the University or the date they withdraw from the last class in which they are enrolled if they do not notify the university. They will receive a grade of “W” in every class in which they were enrolled, and are subject to the tuition refund schedule policy.
 
NOTE: Students on Term Withdrawal (Official or Unofficial) or Academic Leave will be reported to the National Student Clearinghouse as "not enrolled" with an effective date as noted above. Recipients of federal student loans will enter their loan grace period, and if they have previously used up their loan grace period, will immediately enter into loan repayment. “Official” means that the student notified the university; “Unofficial” means that the student did not notify the University, but stopped attending all the courses in which they were enrolled.

c. Permanent Withdrawal
 
Law students who no longer wish to continue to study at the law school should notify the Office of the Academic Dean of the law school. Students who make the decision to leave before finishing the semester in which they are enrolled will be withdrawn as of the date they notify the administration. For those students who inform the law school of their intent to withdraw for a future semester, the withdrawal date will be the last day of the semester in which they are currently enrolled.
 
Students who withdraw from the University during a semester in which they are enrolled are subject to the tuition refund schedule policy regardless of the reasons for their withdrawal. Exceptions to the refund schedule will be considered by the Withdrawal Committee (dean of students, associate vice president of enrollment services, director of financial aid, academic representative appointed by the provost). Students who withdraw during a semester will receive a “W” grade in each class in which they were registered.
 
Students who do not enroll in the University for a given semester and do not inform the University of their intentions to leave on a temporary or permanent basis will be administratively withdrawn from the University as of the last date to enroll in any class offered for that semester (including modular, i.e., dynamically dated, classes).
Students who have withdrawn from the University will be reported to the National Student Clearinghouse as "not enrolled" with an effective date as noted above. They will enter their federal student loan grace period, and if they have previously used up their student loan grace period, they will immediately enter into loan repayment.
 
If a student who has withdrawn from the law school subsequently decides to return to the law school, he/she must submit an application for admission to the law school Office of Admissions. That application will be considered as an application to the first year class. Credits earned prior to withdrawal from the law school cannot be applied to a subsequent application for admission.
 
 
Within the limits of maximum and minimum course load, students may audit courses in the law school or in the University. Such audited courses are entered on the student’s record but do not count toward either the academic credit or residency requirements. Auditors are not excused from class attendance requirements.
 
 
Students in the law school are subject to the standards of student conduct as set out in the University Policies and Procedures Affecting Students and to the jurisdiction of the Student Judiciary. All members of the law school community are subject to the provisions of the Rules of Professional Conduct for Law Students (see page 117).
 
The LL.M program is not designed to prepare students for a U. S. bar exam. Accordingly, the law school does not guarantee enrollment in any course, graduate or J.D., that bar authorities may require as a condition of eligibility to sit for a bar examination. Students contemplating taking any bar examination should check the requirements carefully to ensure that their academic programs conform to any special rules. Some states require registration with the bar examiners while still a law student. Some states require specific coursework before a law graduate may take the bar examination.
 
J.D. graduates of the Columbus School of Law who are accepted into the CUA LL.M. program may count up to five credits earned in excess of the 84-credit J.D. graduation requirement toward the LL.M. degree, as long as the date of the J.D. is no more than three years prior to the beginning of the LL.M. program. Transfer of credit from other J.D. programs will not be permitted.
 
Students earning academic credit in the LL.M. program will not be permitted to apply that academic credit toward the requirements of a J.D. degree at The Catholic University of America.
 
As an American Bar Association (ABA) accredited law school, the Columbus School of Law is subject to the ABA Standards for Approval of Law Schools. The ABA Standards may be found at http://www.americanbar.org/groups/legal_education/resources/standards.html. Any student at the law school who wishes to assert a complaint regarding the law school’s compliance with the ABA’s Accreditation Standards should submit that complaint in writing to the law school assistant dean for academic affairs (Niedzielko@law.edu or 202-319-6738).
 
1. Reporting the Complaint

A student asserting a complaint regarding the law school’s compliance with the ABA’s Accreditation Standards should submit the complaint in writing, with sufficient detail to permit the law school to investigate the matter, including the specific Accreditation Standard(s) at issue. The complaint must be signed by the student. The complaint must also include the student’s contact information, including name, home and email addresses, and phone number.
 
2. Resolving the Complaint

When a formal written complaint has been made in accordance with paragraph 1, the assistant dean for academic affairs will:
 
a. Acknowledge receipt of the complaint within five (5) business days of receipt,
 
b. Investigate the complaint and attempt to resolve it within thirty (30) business days. Within the thirty (30) day period the assistant dean or associate dean will either meet with the complaining student, or respond to the substance of the complaint in writing. During the meeting, or in the written response, the student shall either receive a substantive response to the complaint, or information about what steps are being taken by the law school to address or further investigate the complaint. If further investigation is needed, the student shall be provided with information about what steps are being taken by the law school to obtain the information and the anticipated timeframe for additional response.
 
c. If, due to extraordinary circumstances, the law school is unable to meet these timeframes, the dean may authorize an extension of time and the student will be notified of the extension and the reason for the extension.
 
3. Appeals

Within ten (10) business days of written notice from the assistant dean for academic affairs regarding final resolution of the complaint, the student may appeal the decision in writing to the dean of the law school.  If such appeal is filed, the dean shall respond, with a written decision, within thirty (30) business days. The decision of the dean shall be final.
 
4. Written Record of Complaints

The Office of the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs in the law school shall maintain a complete written record of each complaint and how it was investigated and resolved.
 

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