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FBI Director James Comey's Visit to CUA Law Draws Media Attention 

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On April 12, 2016, FBI Director James B. Comey Jr. visited the Columbus School of Law to talk about leadership and the important factors the FBI looks for in individuals they are hiring and promoting through their ranks. Following his introductory remarks, Director Comey was asked questions from CUA Law Dean, Daniel F. Attridge, on subjects which ranged from the Apple case to race relations. If you missed the event and would like to view the recording, click here.

The event was attended by members of the press and below are a selection of articles published about Director Comey's visit:


FBI Chief James Comey 'Glad' Dispute With Apple Over Terrorist's Phone Has Ended
From: ABC News
Date: April 12, 2016
By: Mike Levine

. . .

FBI Director James Comey said today he's "glad" the legal fight with Apple involving an iPhone left behind by one of the San Bernardino shooters is over.

The dispute -- which came to an abrupt end last month after the FBI said it found a way to break into the phone without Apple's help -- was "creating an emotion around the issue that was not productive," Comey told law students at Catholic University in Washington, D.C.
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Read full article here.

 

FBI director reflects on Apple dispute
From: USA TODAY
Date: April 12, 2016
By: Kevin Johnson

. . .

"I'm glad the litigation is gone," Comey told students at Catholic University's Columbus School of Law, adding that the "emotion around that issue was not productive."

"Apple is not a demon; I hope people don't perceive the FBI as a demon."

The government's withdraw from San Bernardino case, the director said, has allowed both sides to "take the temperature down'' while allowing a broader public debate to continue.
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Read full article here.

 

FBI Director Likens Apple Encryption Clash to Gun-Control Debate
From: The Wall Street Journal
Date: April 12, 2016
By: Jacob Gershman

. . .

Government regulations used to classify strong encryption technology as a “munition” under export-control law. But that’s not the point that FBI Director James Comey was making when he drew a parallel during a Tuesday at Catholic University’s law school in Washington, D.C.

“Some of the emotion that I’ve received around this issued remind me sometimes, in the absolutist and slippery slope arguments, reminds me of some of the rhetoric we hear in the gun debate,” Mr. Comey said, according to the Associated Press.
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Read full article here.

 

Comey: FBI, Apple Court Clash Created Unproductive 'Emotion'
From: Associated Press
Date: April 12, 2016
By: Eric Tucker

. . .

Comey told an audience of Catholic University law school students that the FBI was correct to ask a judge to force Apple Inc. to help it hack into the phone used by a gunman in the December mass killing in San Bernardino, California.

"That litigation," he said, "had to be brought, in my view, because that case had to be investigated in a reasonable way. That's what that litigation was about."

But generally speaking, Comey said, lawsuits and court fights won't resolve the broader collision between privacy and national security. He said he regretted that the San Bernardino case in particular had "created an emotion around the issue that was not productive" and was glad that that case had ended.

"We can't resolve these really important issues that affect our values — technology, innovation, safety and all kinds of other things — in litigation," he said.
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Read full article here.

 

FBI Director Comey calls 'emotion' surrounding Apple case unproductive, says encryption needs legislative resolution
From: appleinsider
Date: April 12, 2016
By: Mike Campbell

. . .

Speaking today at Catholic University's Columbus School of Law, Comey opened up about the FBI's brief — but intense — court battle with the world's largest tech company, reports USA Today.

"I'm glad the litigation is gone," Comey said, adding that the "emotion around that issue was not productive." He later said, "Apple is not a demon; I hope people don't perceive the FBI as a demon."
. . .

Read full article here.