The Catholic University of America

 

 

Justice Ridgely, at left, has been a leader in the integration of technology into the judicial process. He is chair of the Delaware Supreme Court's e-Filing Committee and previously served as co-chair of the ABA Judicial Division’s Court Technology Committee. In 2005 the Delaware Supreme Court became the first appellate court in the nation to implement electronic filing of appeals.

 

Justice Henry duPont Ridgely, Class of 1973,
to Retire from Delaware Supreme Court

 

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Catholic University law school alumnus Henry duPont Ridgely, 1973, has announced his intention to retire as a justice of the Delaware Supreme Court effective Jan. 31, 2015.

Delaware Gov. Jack Markell issued a statement that said, in part, “In addition to his firm commitment to justice, Justice Ridgely was intently focused on the continual improvement of the judicial system, as well as ensuring equality and fairness within the criminal justice system.”
 
Ridgely was appointed as a justice of the state’s Supreme Court in 2004, after serving for 14 years as President Judge of the Superior Court. Among many other honors, Ridgely is a two-time recipient of the Chief Justice of Delaware’s Award for Outstanding Judicial Service.
 
Justice Ridgely is a Member of the American Law Institute, a Life Fellow of the American Bar Foundation, a Fellow of the National Conference of State Trial Judges, a Member of the American Bar Association’s House of Delegates, a Member of the Executive Committee of the Appellate Judges Conference of the Judicial Division of the American Bar Association, a Member of the American Inns of Court Leadership Council, a former Trustee of the American Inns of Court, a Member of the National Advisory Council of the American Judicature Society and a former Member of the American Judicature Society’s Board of Directors.

Justice Ridgely was an honored guest of the Columbus School of Law in 2011, when he offered remarks at a luncheon “Celebration of the Judiciary”, which recognized 18 graduates who now serve as judges.