The Catholic University of America

 

Christopher Bubb, VP and associate general counsel, Yahoo!, and chief of the computer crimes section, Office of Attorney General of New Jersey; with CUA Law alum Amy S. Mushahwar, 2005, Of Counsel, Ballard, Spahr LLP, co-chair FCBA Data Privacy Committee and editor, ABA Data Security Handbook.

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The government intends to step up its policing of the Internet, but how and when remain open questions, according to leading experts. 
It’s a complicated equation, and legislation introduced so far to deal with such issues as Internet privacy or the theft of copyrighted property has failed to gather enough support to move ahead in Congress.
 
Catholic University law school alumna Amy S. Mushahwar, 2005, Of Counsel, Ballard, Spahr LLP, co-chair FCBA Data Privacy Committee and editor, ABA Data Security Handbook, joined Christopher Bubb, vice president and associate general counsel, Yahoo!, and chief of the computer crimes section, Office of Attorney General of New Jersey, for a Feb. 7 discussion of the issue at the Columbus School of Law.
 
Their talk, “Internet Privacy: Email Scanning, Behavioral Advertising & the Legal Implications of Commercial Interception,” offered students an overview of some of the major Internet issues facing regulators and service providers today.
 
Bubb predicted that a “sea change” is brewing in Washington, as lawmakers move away from drafting overly broad bills that could potentially create as many problems as they set out to solve.
 
Bubb blasted the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA), introduced in 2011, as an “absurd” piece of legislation, one that prompted many Internet giants such as Google and Reddit to organize protests and petition drives against it. The bill was tabled in 2012 and is unlikely to be resurrected.
 
The talk was sponsored by Catholic University’s Law and Public Policy Program and the Institute for Communications Law Studies.